Holidays

For information on a specific Jewish Holy Day please continue reading one of the articles below or use the menu to the left.

Yom Kippur

Yom Kippur means "Day of Atonement" and refers to the annual Jewish observance of fasting, prayer and repentance. Part of the High Holidays, which also includes Rosh HaShanah, Yom Kippur is considered the holiest day on the Jewish calendar.

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Hanukkah

Hanukkah (alternately spelled Chanukah), meaning "dedication" in Hebrew, refers to the joyous eight-day celebration during which Jews commemorate the victory of the Maccabees over the armies of Syria in 165 B.C.E. and the subsequent liberation and "rededication" of the Temple in Jerusalem.

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Purim

Purim is celebrated with a public reading—usually in the synagogue—of the Scroll of Esther (M'gillat Esther), which tells the story of the holiday.

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Pesach

Pesach, known as Passover in English, is a major Jewish spring festival, commemorating the Exodus from Egypt over 3,000 years ago.

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Shavuot

Shavuot is the Hebrew word for "weeks" and refers to the Jewish festival marking the giving of the Torah at Mount Sinai, which occurs seven weeks after Passover.

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*Tishah B'av: A Brief History

in Jewish Holidays
Tishah B'Av means "Ninth of Av" and refers to a Jewish day of fasting and mourning.Excerpted from The Jewish Home by Daniel B. Syme. URJ PressTraditionally Tishah B'Av is the darkest of all days, a time set aside for mourning the destruction of both ancient…